Trainees

Michael Adams

Michael Adams

Michael Adams is a fourth year medical student at UNC. His research interests include genomic screening of the general population using massively parallel sequencing technologies (working with Dr. Jonathan Berg), non-invasive prenatal testing (working with Dr. Neeta Vora), and other clinical applications of genetics and genomics. Prior to medical school, he received an M.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Duke University, as well as a B.S. in Physics from UNC-Chapel Hill. Before graduate school, he worked as a software engineer at IBM.

   
James Coleman

James Coleman

James Coleman is an intern with the UNC Center for Genomics and Society and a research assistant for the UNC Center for Health Equity Research. He received his B.A. in anthropology and psychology from East Carolina University in the spring of 2015.  His research interests include how the combination of genetics and environment affects individual and community health, health disparities, and the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness in minority and underserved communities. He plans to attend graduate school to pursue a degree in either public health or health psychology

   
Dragana Lassiter

Dragana Lassiter

Dragana Lassiter is a doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology at UNC-Chapel Hill. She received her B.A. in Anthropology and Psychology from Temple University. Her dissertation research, funded by the International Research & Exchanges Board, examines bioethics and organ transplant in Serbia and brings scholarship on language, performance and documents to bear on questions of corruption, trust and consent. As a CGS trainee, Dragana has worked with Drs. Gail Henderson and Jean Cadigan on the U.S. Biobank study and maintains interest in the ethical issues of biobanking. She has co-authored articles on biobanking and on sociological examinations of ethics and abortion law, including "Standardization as Performative Accountability in Biobanking," in Biosocieties; and “Prefacing the Script” as an Ethical Response to State-Mandated Abortion Counseling, in the American Journal of Bioethics

 
Gabriel Lázaro

Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz

Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, Ph.D., M.B.E., J.D., is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Center for Genomics and Society in the Department of Social Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine.  Since July 2014, he has served as an intern on the UNC Hospitals Ethics Committee.  Dr. Lázaro-Muñoz’s current study “Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Translational Psychiatric Genomics” (ELSI-TPG) is a Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute. ELSI-TPG examines challenges associated with conducting psychiatric genomics research with severely mentally ill populations, and integrating genomics into psychiatric care and prevention. Dr. Lázaro-Muñoz holds a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from New York University, a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Law, a Master of Bioethics from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras. His research interests include ethical, legal and social implications of advances in genomics and neuroscience; psychiatric genetics; clinical and research ethics; neuroethics; neurolaw; mental health ethics and law; and science public policy.

 

 
Anya Prince

Anya Prince

Anya Prince, J.D., is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at the UNC Center for Genomics and Society (CGS) in the Department of Social Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine.  She received her Juris Doctor and Masters of Public Policy from Georgetown University. Her research explores the ethical, legal, and social implications of genomic testing, with particular focus on genetic discrimination and privacy rights, the intersection of clinical and research ethics, and insurance coverage of genetic technologies and interventions. As a UNC postdoc she has published a variety of articles in legal, bioethics, and medical journals, including the American Journal of Bioethics, Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics, and Genetics in Medicine; and has presented and been an invited speaker at conferences across the country. Since July 2014, she has served as an intern on the UNC Hospitals Ethics Committee and conducted research on membership recruitment and practice of law issues for ethics committees. She is a recipient of UNC’s 2015 Postdoctoral Award for Research Excellence and has received additional research funding from the Skadden Foundation for her work on the hospital ethics committee. Ms. Prince was recently awarded a Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) from the National Human Genome Research Institute to examine the use of genetic information by life, long-term care, and disability insurers. Following her time at the CGS, she plans to continue her work on the ethical and legal implications of genomic technologies as a professor at a law school.

 

   
Ajene Robinson-Burris

Ajené Robinson-Burris

Ajene Robinson-Burris is a Senior Undergraduate at UNC-Chapel Hill, majoring in both Global Studies and Philosophy, and minoring in Classical Humanities. She is currently a McNair Scholar and a Parr Center for Ethics Fellow. Her most recent research projects have examined the relationship of policies to biocolonial aspects of genetic research with indigenous people, and the problems of the WHO and UN approaches to abolishing female circumcision in Kenya. Ajene plans to pursue a Ph.D. for an academic career in Bioethics and Legal/Politcal Philosophy so she can continue to analyze sociocultural and political institutions with regards to the ways global policies are made and carried out worldwide.

 

   
John Runge

John Runge

John Runge is a third year doctoral student in the Curriculum of Genetics and Molecular Biology at UNC-Chapel Hill. He works in Dr. Terry Magnuson’s lab studying chromatin dynamics in the context of mammalian development and cancer using genome-wide technologies. His dissertation project centers on the epigenetic mechanisms involved in gene expression. His interests as a trainee with the Center for Genomics and Society focus on the application of genomic findings in health and public policy. Prior to graduate school, John completed an honors degree in History at UNC and worked in a pharmacology lab studying drug resistance in breast cancer. Following the completion of his PhD, John plans to continue studying the basic science and clinical applications of genomic research in academic settings.

   
Harlyn Skinner

Harlyn Skinner

Harlyn Skinner, M.S., is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Nutrition at UNC-Chapel Hill. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Yale University, and M.S. in Biochemistry, and Molecular and Cellular Biology from Georgetown University. Her research interests include genomics, health disparities, obesity prevention, and obesity related health policy. She currently works for Dr. Alice Ammerman, DrPH, RD, on Heart Healthy Lenoir (HHL), a project investigating obesity prevention as a means of cardiovascular disease risk prevention in rural North Carolina (http://www.hearthealthylenoir.com/). Her dissertation focuses on the impact of return of results to African-Americans related to genetic findings from SNP profiles within the HHL population.