Trainees

Gabriel Lázaro

Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz

Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, Ph.D., M.B.E., J.D., is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Center for Genomics and Society in the Department of Social Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine.  Since July 2014, he has served as an intern on the UNC Hospitals Ethics Committee.  Dr. Lázaro-Muñoz’s current study “Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Translational Psychiatric Genomics” (ELSI-TPG) is a Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute. ELSI-TPG examines challenges associated with conducting psychiatric genomics research with severely mentally ill populations, and integrating genomics into psychiatric care and prevention. Dr. Lázaro-Muñoz holds a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from New York University, a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Law, a Master of Bioethics from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras. His research interests include ethical, legal and social implications of advances in genomics and neuroscience; psychiatric genetics; clinical and research ethics; neuroethics; neurolaw; mental health ethics and law; and science public policy.

Karen Meagher

Karen Meagher

Karen Meagher, Ph.D. is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Center for Genomics and Society in the Department of Social Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine. She is currently working on research ethics and public policy implications of preventive genomic screening for adults. She is also collaborating on a social science and ethics project integrated into Phase I HIV treatment interruption trials in Thailand. She has published numerous articles on bioethics in journals such as Public Health Reports, the American Journal of Bioethics, and Developing World Bioethics. From 2012-2015 she worked as a Senior Policy and Research Analyst on the staff of President Barack Obama’s Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. While on the staff, she contributed to federal reports on such topics as incidental findings in clinical, research, and direct-to-consumer settings; ethics and the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease epidemic; and improving bioethics policy-making and ethics education in the United States. While a graduate student at Michigan State University (MSU), she served as an undergraduate advisor in the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences; and as a reviewer on Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) for MSU and the Michigan Department of Community Health. She received a B.A. in biology from Hamilton College in 2004, and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from MSU in 2012. Her Ph.D. dissertation was entitled A Virtue Approach to Public Health Ethics.

 

Anya Prince

Anya Prince

Anya Prince, J.D., is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at the UNC Center for Genomics and Society (CGS) in the Department of Social Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine.  She received her Juris Doctor and Masters of Public Policy from Georgetown University. Her research explores the ethical, legal, and social implications of genomic testing, with particular focus on genetic discrimination and privacy rights, the intersection of clinical and research ethics, and insurance coverage of genetic technologies and interventions. As a UNC postdoc she has published a variety of articles in legal, bioethics, and medical journals, including the American Journal of Bioethics, Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics, and Genetics in Medicine; and has presented and been an invited speaker at conferences across the country. Since July 2014, she has served as an intern on the UNC Hospitals Ethics Committee and conducted research on membership recruitment and practice of law issues for ethics committees. She is a recipient of UNC’s 2015 Postdoctoral Award for Research Excellence and has received additional research funding from the Skadden Foundation for her work on the hospital ethics committee. Ms. Prince was recently awarded a Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) from the National Human Genome Research Institute to examine the use of genetic information by life, long-term care, and disability insurers. Following her time at the CGS, she plans to continue her work on the ethical and legal implications of genomic technologies as a professor at a law school.

 

Kate Saylor

Kate Saylor

Kate Saylor, M.S., is a doctoral student in the Public Policy PhD program.  She is currently working with Drs. Gail Henderson and Jean Cadigan on biospecimen ownership policies and perceptions.  Prior to starting her doctoral studies in 2016, Kate worked as a science policy analyst at the National Institutes of Health, where she contributed to the development and implementation of research policies related to genomics, data sharing, precision medicine, and informed consent.  These projects helped shape her current research interests in bioethics and science policy, including how people understand and use complex scientific information.  Kate is a member of the Royster Society of Fellows at UNC and a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.  She holds a B.A. from Macalester College, where she studied biology, psychology and music, and a M.S. in neuroscience from Oregon Health and Sciences University, where she studied the receptor cells of the inner ear.  

 

Maggie Waltz

Maggie Waltz

Margaret Waltz, Ph.D., is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Center for Genomics and Society in the Department of Social Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Case Western Reserve University where she researched patients’ experiences of waiting in medical waiting rooms and how medical institutions structure patients’ time. Her research interests include the ethical and social implications of genomic technologies; (bio)medicalization; and the performance of emotional labor among medical care providers. She is currently working on ethical and social implications of preventive genomic screening for adults, including return of results in the GeneScreen project.